Boiler Inclusion Project



People are often inexperienced at interacting with others who differ from them (e.g., based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, and many other characteristics), and they “naturally” flock to similar others. In addition, cultural stereotypes about many groups are learned and reinforced across our lifetimes. These stereotypes can influence people’s feelings and behaviors, and often in very subtle ways that escape our conscious awareness. This DTA, called the Boiler Inclusion Project, draws from the empirical literature related to intergroup relations, diversity and inclusion to build a program intended to set in motion a range of positive intergroup behaviors. Creating a more inclusive and inter-culturally competent climate will benefit Purdue Boilermakers during their on-campus experiences and beyond. The full program (50 minutes) explores a variety of topics related to diversity and inclusion, and includes five professionally developed videos that transport viewers into situations that encourage learning, engagement and competence.

The hour-long Boiler Inclusion presentation, delivered to incoming students during BGR 2017, can be used in other orientations, workshops, or classes to address issues relation to diversity, inclusion, and intergroup relations.

Confrontation and Dialoguing

We can choose to stand up and confront others about offensive remarks or behaviors, which can lead to some very useful dialoguing and mutual understandings.

First Impressions

We can get beyond our first impressions, which are often based on stereotypes, by talking to and engaging with others.

Implicit Bias and Self-Regulation

Biases often occur automatically or without our conscious awareness, but with a process called self-regulation, we can learn to avoid biased responding.

Incremental Process

Learning to interact with others who are different from us without relying on stereotypes is often a gradual or incremental process.

Things People Say (Common Stereotypes)

This video depicts common stereotypes that are directed at people based on their social identities (e.g., race, religion, etc.).

Prepared by:
Margo J. Monteith
Professor Psychological Sciences

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